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Field Trips

Tuesday 4/18 Wednesday 4/19 Thursday 4/20 Friday 4/21
  One Day and Multi-Day
Overnight Trips


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A rich, diverse and unique array of field trips is being offered in association with the conference.
This is an exciting opportunity to learn from professionals and see first-hand the major seismogenic faults of the San Francisco Bay Area as well as the built environment with which they interact. Participants can choose among short trips during the week as well as post-conference all-day
and multi-day overnight trips.

COMMEMORATION DAY - Tuesday, April 18, 2006
  # T-1 Downtown San Francisco in Earthquake, Fire and Recovery
  Leaders: Stephen Tobriner, UCB
Day and Time:
Tuesday, April 18, 2:00 - 5:30 (repeated on Friday)
Transportation: Walking
Cost: $20
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 25
Description: This walking tour will highlight the buildings that survived the earthquake and fire of 1906 and those built during the early reconstruction of San Francisco. We will be looking at steel-frame and brick load-bearing masonry buildings, primarily on Market and Mission Streets, examining damage from the earthquake of 1906 and the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989.

We will tour the interiors of the old Call (Claus Spreckel's) Building (1898) that survived the earthquake and fire and the Humboldt Bank Building (1906), regarded as one of the most earthquake-resistant and fire-resistant buildings of the new San Francisco.

Our tour will be passing or touring through important pre- and post-earthquake buildings including the Atlas Building (1905), the Wells Fargo Building (1902), Burdette's Building (1905), the Rialto Building (1902), the Chronicle Building (1889), the Aronson Building (1903), the Phelan Building (1908), Hoffman's Grill (1913), the Sharon Building (1912) and the Palace Hotel (1909).
  # T-2 San Andreas Fault on the San Francisco Peninsula
  Leaders: Tim Hall (Geomatrix), Greg Bartow (SFPUC), and Michele Liapes (SFPUC)
Day and Time: Tuesday, April 18, 2:00-5:30 (repeated on Wednesday, April 19) Transportation: 2 vans (each holds 14 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 24 (plus 1 leader)
Description: A visit to see the San Andreas Fault at several key localities south of San Francisco. In addition to seeing a fence and tree line that were offset in 1906, we will explore well-preserved landforms that mark the active fault trace south of San Andreas Lake. In contrast, we will also visit an area where housing developments were built across the fault prior to enactment of modern state laws that require setbacks. In addition, we will discuss the seismic hazard issues around the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) water supply system, what damage was done to the system in 1906, and the planned retrofit of the system.
  # T-3 Ninth District U.S. Court of Appeals, San Francisco, CA
  Leaders: Peter Lee, SOM
Day and Time: Tuesday, April 18, 2:00-5:30
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 54 (plus 1 leader)
Description: Tour the ornate Ninth District U.S. Court of Appeals retrofitted by the General Services Administration in 1996. The tour will include an overview of the building’s significant historic features and a brief presentation on the history of the facility and summary of the historic rehabilitation and seismic retrofit. We will view the base isolation system used to retrofit and preserve the brittle construction that dates from approximately 1905.

  # T-4 San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge
  Leaders: Charles Rabamad, OES
Day and Time: Tuesday, April 18, 2:00-5:30
Transportation: Small Bus, Boat (limit on boat is 20)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 19 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: A unique opportunity to travel by boat on the San Francisco Bay to visit and discuss the ongoing retrofit of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. The history of the Bridge and its seismic design will be discussed in detail.
  # T-5 Golden Gate Bridge
  Leaders: Moh Huang, CGS, Jerry Kao GGB HTD
Day and Time: Tuesday, April 18, 2:00-5:30
Transportation: Small Bus (holds 24 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 18
Maximum participants: 22 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: The Golden Gate Bridge was opened to traffic in 1937, after ten years of planning and 4 years of construction. It was designed and built using the most advanced structural technology of the time. However, some aspects of the design, analysis, and construction of the bridge are no longer considered suitable in regions of high seismicity. The bridge's deficiencies in seismic resistance were recognized after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.

The Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District requested CGS/CSMIP to install 76 sensors at the bridge in 1995 to measure response of key components of the bridge structure to earthquake ground motions, and provide data for verifying its seismic performance models. The seismic retrofit is divided into three phases. The first phase on the North Viaduct was begun in August 1997 and completed in December 2001. The second phase, on the South Viaduct, is currently underway. The third phase will retrofit the main suspension bridge including the North Anchorage House.

The field trip will include a presentation of retrofit schemes and view the ongoing retrofit work and the array of seismic sensors installed on the bridge.
LEARNING FROM THE PAST - Wednesday, April 19, 2006
  # W-1 Returning a San Francisco Icon to the City, the Renovation of the Ferry Building
  Leaders: Alan Kren, Rutherford & Chekene Consulting Engineers
Day and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 10:00-12:00
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 54 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: The late nineteenth century Ferry Building is an icon of San Francisco. Damaged in 1906, it was repaired and damaged again in 1989 by the Loma Prieta earthquake. The renovation of this historic building undertaken in the 1990's includes seismic retrofit and strengthening. This field trip will visit the Ferry Building and discuss some of the challenges involved in retrofitting a nineteenth century historic building.
  # W-2 Remnant Damage from the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
  Leaders: Jack Boatwright, USGS
Day and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 12:00-2:00
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 52 (Plus 3 Leaders)
Description: This field trip consists of stops at two locations where it is possible to see damage from the 1906 earthquake and to gauge the intensity of the ground shaking that caused the damage. The first stop is at a cemetery in Colma where the damage to monuments and headstones was photographed and roughly quantified in the 1908 Lawson Report. The second stop is at a brick office building at the southern limit of San Francisco that was damaged by the earthquake but repaired in such a fashion that the damage is still clearly evident.
  # W-3 Seismic Retrofits at the University of California, Berkeley Campus, and a Visit to the Hayward Fault
  Leaders: Stephen Tobriner, Don Wells, Peggy Hellweg
Day and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 12:00-5:30
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 47 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 20
Maximum participants: 46 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: The Hayward Fault cuts across the eastern end of the UC Berkeley campus. The first part of this trip examines seismic retrofits to buildings on the campus. The buildings illustrate different retrofit strategies, which were designed specifically for each building. The buildings include the historic South Hall, built in 1870, and Hearst Mining Building, designed by John Gale Howard and completed in 1907.

The second part of the trip is a look at Memorial Stadium, which sits directly astride the creeping trace of the Hayward Fault. We examine visible evidence showing how the stadium structure has been offset by creep, including cracking of walls, tilting of support columns and offset of expansion joints. The final part of the trip is a visit to the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, which has a history dating back to 1887 when the first seismometers were installed. The visit includes historic and modern seismic instruments designed to monitor earthquakes.
  # W-4 The Carquinez Strait Bridge
  Leaders: Mark Ketchum
Day and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 12:00-5:30
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 51 (Plus 4 Leaders)
Description: The Carquinez Strait Bridge is the first new toll bridge in California built to the stringent post-1989 performance-based design standards. Both structurally and architecturally, it is a modern interpretation of a classic suspension bridge. It incorporates many firsts in U.S. suspension bridge design and construction, including drilled shaft foundations, reinforced concrete cellular towers, and an aerodynamically streamlined steel box girder roadway structure with orthotropic deck. This field trip consists of two stops that provide an opportunity to observe the bridge site and the structure.
  # W-5 San Andreas Fault on the San Francisco Peninsula
  Leaders: Carol Prentice (USGS), Greg Bartow (SFPUC), and Michele Liapes (SFPUC)
Day and Time: Tuesday, April 18, 2:00-5:30 (repeated on Wednesday, April 19)
Transportation: 2 vans (each holds 14 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 24 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: A visit to see the San Andreas Fault at several key localities south of San Francisco. In addition to seeing a fence and tree line that were offset in 1906, we will explore well-preserved landforms that mark the active fault trace south of San Andreas Lake. In contrast, we will also visit an area where housing developments were built across the fault prior to enactment of modern state laws that require setbacks. In addition, we will discuss the seismic hazard issues around the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) water supply system, what damage was done to the system in 1906, and the planned retrofit of the system.
  # W-6 Civic Center Buildings
  Leaders: Simin Nasseh, Forell/Elsesser Engineers
Day and Time: Wednesday, April 19, 2:00-5:30
Transportation: 2 Small Buses
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 35
Maximum participants: 44 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: Tour the historic San Francisco Civic Center, part of the City Beautiful Movement civic buildings constructed between 1915 and 1925. The classic buildings are Beaux Arts buildings designed by Aurthur Brown Jr (Bakewell & Brown) / Civic Center & Civic Auditorium and George Kelham Architect (Old Library). Also see new civic center buildings (State Building, Federal Building).
ASSESSING THE PRESENT- Thursday, April 20, 2006
  # TH-1 A Walk Along The Old Bay Margin In Downtown San Francisco: Retracing The Events Of The 1906 Earthquake And Fire
  Leaders: Raymond Sullivan, San Francisco State University
Day and Time: Thursday, April 20, 10:00-12:00
Transportation: Walking
Cost: $20
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 25
Description: We will walk through the part of downtown San Francisco that was once marshland around the old shore of Mission Bay and Yerba Buena. This former shoreline marks the edge of artificially filled ground recovered from San Francisco Bay. This area became prime real estate property, and by 1906 about a sixth of the City was built on bay fill. During the 1906 earthquake the highest concentration of damage to buildings by ground shaking and liquefaction occurred here. We will discuss the specifics of what occurred as a result of the earthquake as we walk along the old shoreline, and highlight what we have learned about building on artificial fill.
  # TH-2 The San Francisco Emergency Communications Center
  Leaders: Doug Sandy
Day and Time: Thursday, April 20, 10:00-12:00
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $40
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 54 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: This field trip consists of a visit to the site of one of the 1906 Earthquake relief camps and the City & County of San Francisco Emergency Communications Center facility located at 1011 Turk Street. The building, which was completed in 1999, was designed to critical facility building standards, including a base-isolation system, back-up power and cooling systems, and serves as the primary emergency operations center for the City & County of San Francisco.
  # TH-3 Firefighting and the Auxiliary Water System
  Leaders: Charles Scawthorn (Kyoto University) and Frank Blackburn
(Asst. Chief, SFFD, ret.), and Tom O'Rourke (Cornell University)
Day and Time: Thursday, April 20, 12:00-2:30 (repeated on Friday, 1:00-3:30)
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 52 (Plus 3 Leaders)
Description: After the 1906 earthquake and fire, the citizens of San Francisco voted to pass a bond measure in 1908 to establish an earthquake-resistant auxiliary water supply system (AWSS) for fighting fires. The unique system they created is an ingenious engineering marvel of the early 20th century that is still a key element used in fighting large fires today. This bus and walking tour will examine the components of the AWSS from the reservoirs on Twin Peaks to the pumping stations by the Bay. This is both an historic tour and also a tour of present-day fire-fighting facilities in San Francisco.
  # TH-4 Twenty-First Century High-Rises
  Leaders: Neville Mathias, Jennifer Kimura, and Peter Lee
Day and Time: Thursday, April 20, 12:00-2:30
Transportation: Walking
Cost: $20
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 25
Description: This five-building guided tour marks the 100th anniversary of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The walking tour provides an overview of significant tall buildings in San Francisco completed in the 21st century and gives insight to the modern design and seismic innovations of today's skyscrapers in high seismic zones. The St. Regis Tower (42 story), 101 Second Street (26 story), the JP Morgan Chase Building (31 story), The Paramount (39 story), and The Four Seasons Hotel (40 story) will be surveyed in this tour. These buildings showcase a variety of important structural designs and use of materials including: 1) reinforced concrete framed dual system, 2) structural steel framed dual system, 3) steel frame with sloped boxed columns and offsets, 4) precast hybrid moment resistant frame, and 5) steel framed dual system with nonlinear viscous damping.
  # TH-5 Oakland City Hall and the Southern Hayward Fault
  Leaders: Don Wells, Charles Rabamad, and Jim Lienkaemper
Day and Time: Thursday, April 20, 12:00-5:30
Transportation: Small Bus (holds 24 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 22 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: This trip begins with a look at the base isolation system installed in the Oakland City Hall following severe damage in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The Beaux Art City Hall was built in 1914 and is a National Historic Landmark. The second stop is at EBMUD's Claremont Water Tunnel, which crosses the fault, bringing water from the Sierra Nevada to 800,000 customers west of the Oakland-Berkeley Hills. Here we discuss EBMUD's seismic improvement program and the bypass tunnel under construction that will mitigate the potential loss of service due to fault rupture. Then we look at the effects of active fault creep on various structures in Hayward, and an open trench across a spectacular exposure of the Hayward Fault at Lake Elizabeth in Fremont. The last stop is at the Bay Division pipelines that carry water from Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in the Sierra Nevada across south San Francisco Bay and supply most of the water for the city of San Francisco. We will discuss mitigation measures implemented to minimize loss of service in the event of surface rupture on the Hayward Fault at this site.
PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE - Friday, April 21, 2006
  # F-1 Firefighting and the Auxiliary Water System
  Leaders:Charles Scawthorn (Kyoto University) and Frank Blackburn
(Asst. Chief, SFFD, ret.), and Tom O'Rourke (Cornell University)
Day and Time: Friday, April 21, 1:00-3:30 (with optional extension until 5:00)
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $50 (includes lunch)
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 52 (Plus 3 Leader)
Description: After the 1906 earthquake and fire, the citizens of San Francisco passed a bond measure in 1908 to establish an earthquake-resistant auxiliary water supply system (AWSS) for fighting fires. The unique system they created is an ingenious engineering marvel of the early 20th century that is still a key element used in fighting large fires today. This bus and walking tour will examine the components of the AWSS from the reservoirs on Twin Peaks to the pumping stations by the Bay. This is both an historic tour and also a tour of present-day fire-fighting facilities in San Francisco.

NOTE: This trip will return to Moscone Center at 3:30 to drop off any participants who do not wish to continue with the extended tour. The extended tour will visit the Twin Peaks 10 million gallon reservoir, Pump Station number 2, and cisterns that are part of the AWSS.
  # F-2 The Hayward Fault on the UC Berkeley Campus, Berkeley Campus, and a Visit to the Richmond Field Station Shake Table
  Leaders: Don Wells, Peggy Hellweg, and Nick Sitar
Day and Time: Friday, April 21, 1:00-5:30
Transportation: Small Bus (holds 24 passengers)
Cost: $50 (includes lunch)
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 23 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: The Hayward Fault cuts across the eastern end of the UC Berkeley campus. The first part of this trip is a look at Memorial Stadium, which sits directly astride the creeping trace of the Hayward Fault. We examine visible evidence showing how the stadium structure has been offset by creep, including cracking of walls, tilting of support columns and offset of expansion joints. The second part of the trip is a visit to the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, which has a history dating back to 1887 when the first seismometers were installed. The visit includes historic and modern seismic instruments designed to monitor earthquakes. The final part of the trip is to the Berkeley Laboratories of the Earthquake Simulator and Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). The Earthquake Simulator, or "shake table," was the first of its kind ever built in the world and is still the largest in the United States. The tour of the laboratories includes live demonstrations of the equipment.
  # F-3 The Hayward Fault on the UC Berkeley Campus, and a Visit to the Northern Hayward Fault
  Leaders: Nick Sitar, Don Wells, Alan Kropp, Glenn Borchardt
Day and Time: Friday, April 21, 1:00-5:30
Transportation: Small Bus (holds 24 passengers)
Cost: $50 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 22 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: The first stop on this trip is at Memorial Stadium on the UC Berkeley campus, which sits directly astride the creeping trace of the Hayward Fault. We examine visible evidence showing how the stadium structure has been offset by creep, including cracking of walls, tilting of support columns and offset of expansion joints. Potential measures to mitigate the fault rupture hazard at the stadium also will be discussed. The second stop is at the Cragmont Elementary School, which is adjacent to the Hayward Fault in an area of active landsliding. It has been reconstructed recently to meet safety requirements. The third stop is at Point Pinole Regional Shoreline in Richmond where a community of houses built in 1950 is directly on the creeping Hayward Fault, and where we can observe geomorphic features related to the fault, including a prominent fault scarp, sidehill benches, linear troughs, and an active, offset landslide.
  # F-4 Downtown San Francisco in Earthquake, Fire and Recovery
  Leaders: Stephen Tobriner, UCB
Day and Time: Friday, April 21, 1:00-5:30
Transportation: Walking
Cost: $20
Minimum participants: 15
Maximum participants: 25
Description: This walking tour will highlight the buildings that survived the earthquake and fire of 1906 and those built during the early reconstruction of San Francisco. We will be looking at steel-frame and brick load-bearing masonry buildings, primarily on Market and Mission Streets, examining damage from the earthquake of 1906 and the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989. We will tour the interiors of the old Call (Claus Spreckel's) Building (1898) that survived the earthquake and fire and the Humboldt Bank Building (1906), regarded as one of the most earthquake-resistant and fire-resistant buildings of the new San Francisco. Our tour will be passing or touring through important pre- and post-earthquake buildings including the Atlas Building (1905), the Wells Fargo Building (1902), Burdette's Building (1905), the Rialto Building (1902), the Chronicle Building (1889), the Aronson Building (1903), the Phelan Building (1908), Hoffman's Grill (1913), the Sharon Building (1912) and the Palace Hotel (1909).
  # F-5 Aftershock! Personal Stories from the 1906 Earthquake and Fire Oakland Museum of California
  Leader: Aimee Klask
Day and Time: Friday, April 21, 2:00-5:30
Transportation: Walking and BART (public transit)
Cost: $20 (BART ticket and museum entrance fee included)
Minimum participants: 10
Maximum participants: 30
Description: Visit the Oakland Museum of California to view the premiere history exhibit about the 1906 earthquake and fire. Highlights include a shaketable that simulates the 1906 earthquake, a tent used by refugees of the quake and fire, and 15 eyewitness accounts from those who experienced one of the most important events in American history. Field trip participants will take BART to Oakland and will receive a docent-led tour of the exhibit.
One Day and Multi-Day Overnight Trips
  # S-1 Seismic Retrofits at the University of California, Berkeley Campus, and the Hayward Fault in Oakland, Hayward and Fremont
  Leaders: Doris Sloan, Stephen Tobriner and Donald Wells
Day and Time: Saturday, April 22, 8:00-5:30
Transportation: 2 Small Buses (each holds 24 passengers)
Cost: $100
Minimum participants: 33
Maximum participants: 46 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: This trip will begin on the Hayward Fault where it cuts across the eastern end of the UC Berkeley campus. We will discuss seismic retrofits to buildings on the campus, which illustrate different retrofit strategies, and were designed specifically for each type of construction. We will visit Memorial Stadium, which sits directly astride the creeping trace of the Hayward Fault, and see visible evidence showing how the stadium structure has been offset by creep, including cracking of walls, tilting of support columns and offset of expansion joints. Potential measures to mitigate the fault rupture hazard at the stadium also will be discussed. From the UC Berkeley campus the field trip follows the southern Hayward Fault, considered extremely hazardous because of intense urban development along its length.

We stop at EBMUD's Claremont Water Tunnel, which crosses the fault, bringing water from the Sierra Nevada to 800,000 customers west of the Oakland-Berkeley Hills. Then we look at the effects of active fault creep on various structures in Hayward, and an open trench across a spectacular exposure of the Hayward fault at Lake Elizabeth in Fremont. The last stop is at the Bay Division pipelines that carry water from Hetch Hetchy Reservoir in the Sierra Nevada across south San Francisco Bay and supply most of the water for the City of San Francisco.
  # S-2 The 1906 Earthquake Rupture Trace
of the San Andreas Fault North of San Francisco.
  Leaders: Tim Hall and Alexander Dahne
Day and Time: Saturday, April 22, 8:00-5:30
Transportation: Large Bus (holds 55 passengers)
Cost: $100 (lunch included)
Minimum participants: 40
Maximum participants: 53 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: View locations along the 1906 Earthquake rupture trace of the San Andreas fault north of San Francisco, near Point Reyes and Tomales Bay. We will visit several well preserved historical ranch sites to examine the mole track of the earthquake and to relocate 100-year old photographs.

The trip also includes a stop at a paleoseismic research site where coseismic slip and chronology of prehistoric earthquakes have been measured, and stops to discuss geotechnical issues and construction challenges at the north span of the Golden Gate Bridge and at White Hill slide.
  # S-3 The Stanford University Campus and the San Andreas Fault on the San Francisco Peninsula
  Leaders: Phil Stoffer
Day and Time: Saturday, April 22, 8:00-5:30
Transportation: 2 Vans (each can hold 14 passengers)
Cost: $100 (includes lunch)
Minimum participants: 20
Maximum participants: 27 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: This trip combines a tour of the Stanford University campus with a visit to the San Andreas Fault in Sanborn County Park. Many buildings on the Stanford campus were severely damaged in 1906 and the walking tour of the campus will highlight both the 1906 damage and the modern building designed to withstand the next large earthquake. The San Andreas Fault is well expressed in Sanborn County Park where a new earthquake trail has been constructed.

Highlights include geomorphic features associated with the San Andreas Fault such as fault scarps, shutter ridges, sag ponds, and offset streams. The trip will also visit a winery built within the fault zone.
  # S-4 History and Pre-history of earthquakes in southern Sonoma County, California
  Leaders: Suzanne Hecker and Harvey Kelsey
Day and Time: Saturday, April 22, 8:00-5:30
Transportation: Small bus (24 passengers)
Cost: $100 (includes lunch)
Minimum participants: 13
Maximum participants: 22 (Plus 2 Leaders)
Description: This field trip will visit the Rodgers Creek Fault and the City of Santa Rosa. The Rodgers Creek Fault is an important member of the San Andreas Fault system and has a significant probability of producing a large earthquake in the coming decades. We will discuss the paleoseismic record of large earthquakes on the Rodgers Creek fault, which crosses beneath the City of Sant Rosa.

The trip also focuses on the destruction from intense ground shaking in and around Santa Rosa in 1906, its likely causes, and efforts to address the hazard. The 1906 earthquake hit Santa Rosa harder per capita than San Francisco, even though Santa Rosa lies ~40 km east of the San Andreas fault.
  # M-4 The Creeping Section of the San Andreas Fault and SAFOD
(The San Andreas Fault Observatory At Depth)
  Leaders: Michael Rymer and Steve Hickman (USGS)
Day and Time: Depart Saturday, April 22, 8:00 am,
return Sunday April 23, 6:00 pm
Transportation: Van
Cost: $325(includes double occupancy lodging, transportation, breakfast and lunch)
Minimum participants: 10
Maximum participants: 16 (Plus 1 Leader)
Description: The creeping section of the San Andreas and associated faults in central California is a great place to see evidence of active faulting without having to wait for the next surface-rupturing earthquake. A trip to Hollister, San Benito, Mustang Ridge, Parkfield, and SAFOD (the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth), among other locations, will highlight offset fences, offset curbs, cracks in highway paving, displaced rock types, and evidence of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake.

Overall, the trip will progress along the creeping section from northwest to southeast, with emphasis on structural makeup of the fault and geomorphic evidence of the presence of the fault. A special stop will be at the SAFOD deep borehole, where scientific drilling pierced through the San Andreas fault at a depth of about 3 km in the summer of 2005. At this site we will have presentations on drilling, fault zone structure, rock deformation, stress orientation, and seismic imaging.

Tuesday 4/18 Wednesday 4/19 Thursday 4/20 Friday 4/21
  One Day and Multi-Day
Overnight Trips


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An Affiliation of Earthquake Scientists, Engineers, and Emergency Managers.